Courses

This is an overview of ArtScience courses given this Academic Year, subject to the ‘ArtScience Courses of Choice’ stated in the curriculum. Some courses are mandatory for students of certain years, which is mentioned at the course description. All courses are open for students of the Bachelor as well as the Master programme. In occasional situations, only limited numbers of students can attend a certain course. This will be mentioned with the description.

CASS Exchange Workshops are part of the exchange weeks (two weeks after the Autumn Break and two weeks after the Spring Break) between the Creative Departments of the Royal Conservatoire (Composition, Sonology and ArtScience), where all departments offer courses accessible to all of their students.

Master Primers are courses on a higher theoretical level. They are focused on our Master students. Bachelor students can attend, though they should realise the level. In cases of a limited allowed number of students to a Master Primer course, Masters will have priority over Bachelors.

Alternate Perspectives II
Ars Electronica
Art & Philosophy
We Are Compost
The Four Ecologies
The City as Performative Artwork
How to Write for Everything
Introduction to ArtScience
Introduction to Electronics
Introduction to Programming
Int(r)o Projection
Lighting Design for/as Performance
BioPUNK!
MAX/MSP
MetaMedia
Modifying Mental Projections
Movement Matters 2.0
New Arts & Music Theory
The ‘Other’ Senses
‘Pataphysics
Presentation as Performance
Pro Projection
Quick & Dirty
RecPlay
Redeconstruct Media
Sensors, Actuators & Microcontrollers
SoundWorlds
SoundWorlds 2: Sounding Space, Spacing Sound
Spectra – Space as an Organism (3)
Studium Generale
Writing as/in Research



Alternate Perspectives II
Renske Maria van Dam
Mandatory for: free choice (Master Primer)

Early 20th century Russian painter-architect El Lissitzky started to use axonometry to eliminate all reference to the spectator’s point of view. Liberating the viewer from gravity, he hoped, would lead to foundering of the whole system of perception and our established ways of looking upon the world. Almost a century later, following contemporary media, we can see signs of the world’s center of gravity literally shifting. Migration, globalization and digitalization question Western/Europe’s centrality. In 8 session of 3 hours we will explore alternatives to Eurocentric philosophical discourse to reconsider our own habits. We start with the work of philosopher Sophie Bósèdé Olúwolé as an introduction to African Philosophy. Collectively we decide how and where to continue. This course trains you to ‘liberate your point of view from gravity’ and look upon the world from multiple perspectives at the same time. Philosophy in this course is considered to be a creative practice. Thus inspired by philosophical texts you will be challenged to put your thoughts into action.
Literature (selected chapters from):
Olúwolé, S. B. ( 2014) Socrates and Òrúnmìlà.: Two Patron Saints of Classical Philosophy. Lagos: Ark Publishers.

Credits: 2 ECTS
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To shift the bias from the Western cultural discourse into a wider perspective.
Examination: attendance, assignment



Ars Electronica
Robert Pravda, Taconis Stolk, teachers from MediaTechnology (Leiden University)
Mandatory for: B1, M1

Excursion to the Ars Electronica Festival in Linz, Austria: one of the most prominent festivals of new media art in the world.

Credits: 1 ECTS
No. of classes: excursion of approx 4 days
Objective:: To get a first contact with the context of the ArtScience realm and to get to know your fellow students
Examination: attendance



Art & Philosophy
Rob van Gerwen
Mandatory for: B1

Philosophical questions typical for interdisciplinary arts are just like those asked about the arts, traditionally so-conceived. Only with an interdisciplinary art, these questions tend to be more complicated and intertwined. Working from examples, we delve into the philosophy of art in an effort to understand what artscience is, or what it might be.
We look at questions such as: What is artistic material, what should happen for material to become artistic? How does something become a work of art? How do we find out what a work means—how can we discuss about such meanings: isn’t it all very subjective? How may we experience a work in the most fruitful manner—can someone teach you to discern something in a work which you failed to notice on your own? How can art forms be distinguished from each other, and why is it important to think about this? What are the differences between art and real-life, between art and science? Students are challenged to make a work with these questions in mind.

Credits: 2 ECTS
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To gain basic understanding in philosophical issues when making art
Examination: attendance, assignment



We Are Compost
Márton Kabai
Mandatory for: free choice

TBA

Credits: 2 ECTS
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hours
Objective: TBA
Examination: attendance, assignment



The Four Ecologies
Eric Kluitenberg
Mandatory for: free choice (Master Primer)

TBA

Credits: 4 ECTS
No. of classes: 8 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To explore Affect through embodied action in space.
Examination: attendance, assignment



The City as Performative Object
Esther Polak
Mandatory for: free choice

TBA

Credits: 4 ECTS
No. of classes: 8 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To develop skills and insight in how to make artworks in digital media.TBA
Examination: attendance, assignment



How to Write for Everything
Ine Poppe
Mandatory for: B3

As the Professional Practice Preparation course of ArtScience, this week offers specific training in writing, focusing on how to write clearly about your work for grant applications, catalogues and to sponsors and press.

Credits: 2 ECTS
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To learn practical professional writing skills.
Examination: attendance, assignment



Introduction to ArtScience
Taconis Stolk
Mandatory for: B1, M1

This course is an introduction to important developments through the history of the arts that are important to the ArtScience domain. Five approaches to interrelate selected art works will be presented in class. The presented works range from realized and unrealized artworks to concepts. The five approaches are chosen in such a way as to trigger discussion and reflection both on existing works and your own work.

Credits: 1 ECTS
No. of classes: 2 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To gain basic contextual understanding of the ArtScience domain.
Examination: attendance, participation



Introduction to Electronics
Lex van den Broek
Mandatory for: B1

This is a general introduction to working with electronics. It consists of three introductory classes. After those you are expected to finish your first electronic patch in individual appointments with Lex van den Broek.

Credits: 1 ECTS
No. of classes: 4 classes of 2.5 hours plus individual appointments
Objective: To gain fundamental skills in how to build electronic circuits for artistic purposes.
Examination: attendance, assignment



Introduction to Programming
Jeroen Meijer
Mandatory for: B1

This is an introductory course into computer programming, using the Python language. After following this course, students will have a basic insight into computer programming and will know where to start creating digital prototypes for future projects that involve interaction, image, sound, video, networks and electronics.

Credits: 4 ECTS
No. of classes: 8 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To learn the basics of computer coding.
Examination: attendance, assignment



Int(r)o Projection
Kasper van der Horst
Mandatory for: B1

The intention of this course is to experiment in a playful way with projection in relation to your work. Besides displaying computer- and video images, projection is often used to define a space or, for example, to enhance the meaning of an object in a space. Also shadow and coloured light can be interpreted as projection.
As an assignment, you will be asked to make a projection design that connects with your own work and/or ideas.
keywords: •projecting on objects •surfaces •live playing •how to use audio signals •no-source •feedback video •minimal projection •ganzfeld projection •we’ll also briefly look into how tv’s, videorecorders and analog video mixers work.
For students who followed an earlier projection course, there will be some new topics to look into, such as video mapping, high quality projection and the use of the more advanced digital video mixers that combine analog and digital image sources.
Due to the available amount of equipment, there’s a limited number of students that can enrol.

Credits: 2 ECTS
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To learn the basics of projection for artistic experiments.
Examination: attendance, assignment



Lighting Design for/as Performance
Katinka Marač
Mandatory for: B1

The goal of this course is to give an introduction to the theory and practice of lighting design and handling basic stage equipment. We will explore how meaning can be created using the exceptional possibilities of the medium light and how lighting design can be deployed in / as performance. During the course we’ll trace back the origins of lighting design in contemporary performance, by looking into the work and compositional methods of renowned American artists from the sixties and seventies and some of their contemporary predecessors as Xavier le Roi. In the seventies artists as Robert Rauschenberg and members of the New York based Judson group shared a keen interest in working at the intersection of (dance) performance, visual art and art & technology. They drastically changed (theatrical) performance, and the role of set and lighting design, freeing it from its former supportive role and incorporating them as equal elements in, or as starting points for performances. The course is set up as a creative lab. We’ll start with a short introduction in the various elements of a lighting design, including types of light, angles and colour and an introduction to technical aspects such as patch board, dimmers and the lighting board. We’ll research how lighting design can be used to create, structure and alter content, space and time and will work on lighting design as performance.

Credits: 2 ECTS
No. of classes: 4 classes of 8 hours
Objective: To master theory and practice of basic lighting design for artistic purposes.
Examination: attendance, assignment



BioPUNK!
Michiel Pijpe
Mandatory for: free choice

TBA

Credits: 2 ECTS
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To learn how to deal with biological material in the context of art.
Examination: attendance, assignment



MAX/MSP
Johan van Kreij
Mandatory for: free choice

An introductory course for the graphical programming environment MAX/MSP. More information to follow.

Credits: 2 ECTS
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To learn the basics of MAX/MSP.
Examination: attendance, assignment



MetaMedia
Taconis Stolk
Mandatory for: B1

A work of art does not confine itself to an object, a picture or a sound composition. Especially not in the 21st century, where all kinds of communication technologies and strategies can be used to compose the context of art, or even to create works in disciplines and using methods that were never explored by artists before. In this course, students are given a theoretical and practical framework on how to compose concepts and context. Approaching contemporary art as a conceptual communication model opens possibilities for unusual works of art and a critical attitude towards traditional artistic paradigms, but it also creates a framework for students to develop new and effective strategies for a professional creative position in a media world. Students will create their own metamedial works during the course.

Credits: 2 ECTS
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To develop a more abstract view on possibilities of artistic expression using media that are not normally used in an artistic manner.
Examination: attendance, assignment



Movement Matters 3.0
Cocky Eek, Renske Maria van Dam
Mandatory for: free choice

TBA

Credits: 4 ECTS
No. of classes: 8 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To develop new artistic visions on space.
Examination: attendance, assignment



New Arts & Music Theory
David Dramm (KC), Gabriel Payuk (KC), Eric Kluitenberg et al
Mandatory for:

This course is offered to all first-year students of ArtScience, Composition and Sonology. It provides a cross-disciplinary exploration of recent ideas, practices and techniques in music and related arts: verbal, visual, theatrical, and much else. New forms of creative practice and new platforms for its presentation are investigated, ranging from the conventional concert hall to the alternative spaces of galleries, installations, site-specific composition, the internet, etc. The relationship and the “fit” between new forms of thought and new forms of presentation will be a recurring topic throughout the course, as will the challenge of writing about such new media in the face of an evolving and still-developing critical language that attempts to avoid irrelevant criteria from past art forms.

Credits: 3 ECTS
No. of classes: approx 24 classes of 2 hours
Objective: To gain knowledge on recent theories and ideas in music and related arts and sciences.
Examination:



The ‘Other’ Senses
Caro Verbeek
Mandatory for: B1

The senses of  smell, taste, touch and proprioception are powerful tools for engaging an audience in an intimate and often interactive way. They require little knowledge and they are strong inducers of vivid memories.
Whereas sound and vision always gained a lot of academic attention, the so called ‘lower’ senses only recently (re-)entered the artistic debate. The ArtScience Interfaculty, formerly known as the Institute for Image and Sound, underlines the importance of those other senses that go beyond our traditional occularcentric approach.
This course is about creating awareness and understanding of the role of the ‘other’ senses – smell, touch and taste – in (history of) art, education and science.
For they are not as divided as we assume, the correlation between the senses will also be addressed (synaesthesia).
Due to their animalistic nature important thinkers like Plato, and later on Kant and Hegel excluded the lower senses from the aesthetic debate. As a counter-reaction famous artists like Marinetti and Duchamp and composers such as Scriabin incorporated olfactory and tactile dimensions to their work. Unfortunately this quite volatile heritage was partially lost due to its fleeting nature and the impossibility of registering and preserving smells, tastes and tactile experiences. Museums and other institutes that address vision, have always been primed to collect and conserve. That is why many tactile and olfactory works of art never made it into written history. Anthropologists, art historians and other academics are now working on a reconstruction.
During classes students will encounter sensory art historical reconstructions to stimulate debate on the senses and as an inspiration to create small olfactory and tactile compositions. A colour-smell synaesthesia test will be executed on the first and the last day of the course.
Furthermore there will be a linguistic translation of a Futurist tactile poem, and an olfactory-musical recital composed by Scriabin.

Credits: 2 ECTS
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To develop knowledge about artistic practices for other human senses than the usual sight and hearing.
Examination: attendance, assignment



‘Patafysica
Matthijs van Boxsel
Mandatory for: free choice

Morosophers are people with an evidently absurd theory about existence. Unlike the mediocre theories of New Age gurus, astrologers, ufologists and so on, morosophical studies are so queer that they cannot help acquiring a literary quality. The most important criterion of morosophy is originality: the less predecessors and followers, the greater the chance of being included in my book. The word morosophy [fool-osophy] means: foolish wisdom or wise foolishness. Morosophs operate at the crossroads of science, religion, art and madness. Is the earth flat? Was Dutch spoken in paradise? Are atoms spaceships? Is Delft Delphi? Can the floor plan of the pyramid of Cheops be found in the street plan of ‘s-Hertogenbosch? Is the world entering the Lilac phase? Did abstract thought commence when the clitoris evolved from the inside to the outside?
As a rule, a morosopher is somebody whose world has been destroyed by a shocking event. With the help of his theory he managed to reconstruct a new universe from the wreckage, for the sake not of a higher truth, but of an endurable existence. Morosophers are not dreamers; they are healthy thanks to a phantasm within which they are lord and master. To the extent that they bother to follow scientific insights, this is to stimulate their fantasy. Unimpeded by any scientific knowledge, their imagination enables them to force their way through to the world of science and technology. From there they design a parallel universe in which the limits of the possible are sought out and transgressed; they enter the area of the wondrous and the monstrous, and discover a world that, like the world of the comic and the fairy-tale, is out of the reach of the physicists. Morosophy is science in wonderland.
Matthijs van Boxsel will be giving lectures and a workshop on ’Pataphysics, the Science of Imaginary Solutions. ’Pataphysics feeds on metaphysical subjects, scientific discoveries, art and cabaret. The French writer Alfred Jarry (1873–1907), who developped the science of sciences, conceived a brain-washing machine, Perpetual Motion Food, and computed the surface of God.
’Pataphysics was at the root of futurism, dadaïsm and surrealism, but has since developped in the Oupeinpo (Ouvroir de peinture potentielle): it analyses the pre-existing constraints, and investigates new forms of potential creations within the arts.
On the one hand we will develop imaginary islands, languages, calenders etc.
On the other we will be looking for the pataphysical dimension of everday life by means of simple interventions: ’Pataphysics being the science of the exception.

Credits: 2 ECTS
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To learn to think and act ‘pataphisically.
Examination: attendance, assignment



Presentation as Performance
Hilt De Vos
Mandatory for: free choice

In this workshop you will learn how to use your body and voice as communication tools for performance and presentation. How does an audience perceive you as a human being on stage. What role does your body play in communication. What tone of voice will work best in a given context and.. how to overcome anxiety and a possible nervous breakdown.
To reach these goals we will do exercises to effectively use your body and voice, while remaining yourself on stage.
The format is master class which means the focus is on the individual but is also a collective learning experience.
PLEASE NOTE: however called ‘masterterclass’, this course (like other courses) is available for Bachelor as well as Master students.

Credits: 2 ECTS
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To gain insight and develop skills in physical presence in presentations.
Examination: attendance, assignment



Pro Projection
Kasper van der Horst
Mandatory for: free choice

The Pro Projection course is aimed at students who are planning to use some form of projection in their work.
Besides displaying computer- and video images, projection is often used to define a space or, for example, to enhance the meaning of an object in a space. In this very hands-on and practical course we’ll explore these aspects considering the projects or ideas that the students bring in individually.
We ‘ll explore how different technical resources are best put to use and what impact that could have on the experience of the work. This might result in some radical alternatives to the original plan!  We‘ll try out and test a lot so that a high level of precision can be reached.
Hopefully in this way we’ll put the original ideas into an enriched perspective.

Credits: 4 ECTS
No. of classes: 8 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To gain advanced knowledge and skills in artistic possibilities of projection.
Examination:



Quick & Dirty
Cocky Eek
Mandatory for: B1

In this course you will be dipped in a method of the making process. The making process by its own nature, offers many surprising, irrational, accidental possibilities that the mind simply cannot predict or imagine.
The class will explore this creative process as a dialogue between maker and matter in diverse mediated forms, in which matter can be interpreted broadly, but which is always the available reality that is transformed in the making process. We’ll do quick hands-on experiments and dirty prototyping, with the aim to train our skills of perception, to learn to recognize when/where things get interesting, and to tap in the enormous potential that comes by working open-ended.
You will work on an individual base as well in a group process and documentation/recording can be helpful tool in the making process.
No Matter – Try Again – Fail Again – Fail Better, Samuel Beckett

Credits: 2 ECTS
No. of classes: 4 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To learn how to master quick artistic sketching methodologies.
Examination: attendance, assignment



RecPlay
Kasper van der Horst, Robert Pravda
Mandatory for: free choice

Since 2001, RecPlay is the ArtScience improvisation ensemble. Some of the research topics that are adressed in the RecPlay are multi-player interfaces, improvisation structures, noise art, feedback in image and sound, realtime composition systems, spatial compositions and interaction with architectural elements. Its practical focus will be on developing improvisations and compositions and on developing ensemble playing using unconventionall instruments.
For a number of years, students have participated in this live electronica and mechanica improvisation group initiated by Robert Pravda. It has had regular performances in various well- known as well as obscure venues, for instance in places like Vooruit, Gent, Zeebelt, Den Haag, Worm, Rotterdam, TodaysArt festival and EXIS, Den Haag, RADIO West, STRP festival Eindhoven, Korzo, Den Haag, Transmediale, Berlin and many more.

Credits: 4 ECTS (first semester) + 4 ECTS (second semester)
No. of classes: approx 10 classes of 2.5 hours (first semester) + approx 10 classes of 2.5 hours (second semester) plus presentations
Objective: To learn how to work in an audiovisual improvisation ensemble.
Examination: attendance, performances



Redeconstruct Media
Kasper van der Horst, Nenad Popov
Mandatory for: free choice

In a number of steps, we aim to look a bit into the phenomena of fragmented media. In our case, media can be only available in fragments, or media that are fragmented for an artistic reason. During the course, we like to look at media in the broadest (metamedia) sense, for example text, literature, data, dna, images, pixels, artworks, audio and video can be your point of interest.  We’ll look into the art of abbreviation as well as into more or less speculative reconstruction methods of media. ( veracious or manupilative : redeconstruct )
Our objective is to design individual systems to do this, and because we can also design these systems in an artistic way, that is where we will focus on.  Some participants will stay in the analogue domain, while others might find algorithmic solutions to work with.  After the first steps of exploring we take our time to develop a very personal point of view for each individual student’s perspective. At the end of this two week’s course we ‘ll ask you to present your system in the format of a work or to present a conclusion of how your system works.
keywords:
•context recreation •artificial consequence •context recreation algorthms/systems
•fragmented sources/media/content •construct new truths •cloudlike media presence •reconstruct media •redeconstruct media

Credits: 4 ECTS
No. of classes: 8 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To learn how to handle the defragmentation of contemporary media in an artistic manner.
Examination: attendance, assignment



Sensors, Actuators & Microcontrollers
Lex van den Broek, Johan van Kreij
Mandatory for: free choice

This course is a continuation of the Introduction to Electronics that is given in the first year. It is open to other students who have at least some familiarity with the most basic concepts of electronics. In this course students learn how to understand and build simple setups consisting of a sensor, a controller and an actuator. The concepts behind controllers like the ipsonlab and the Arduino or Wiring board are introduced. The most common types of sensors are introduced and how to connect them and interpret the data they produce. Also the most common actuators will be introduced.

Credits: 4 ECTS
No. of classes: 8 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To gain more advanced insight in the creation of electronic circuits for artistic purposes.
Examination: attendance, assignment



SoundWorlds
Robert Pravda, Milica Ilić
Mandatory for: B1

The goal of this course is to introduce the theory and practice of working with sound, to teach the handling of basic recording and studio equipment and to offer basic insight in general music theory. Also a short introduction will be given to the history of electro-acoustic music and basic concepts of composition.
The theoretical part will cover:
– Basic parameters of sound, such as the concepts of sound as change of pressure through the air, waveform and harmonic spectrum of the sound, wavelength, amplitude, frequency and perception of pitch and loudness. Also we will discuss the basics of analog sound, digital sound, synthesis basics (additive, subtractive synthesis, Frequency modulation) and MIDI.
– An introduction to the basics of musical dramaturgy, or “how to organise sound” – historical overview, explaining & exploring different musical tools and their practical use, demystification of the so called “classical music” world, with the goal of expanding the palette of means that can be used in artistic work which includes sound/music.
On the practical side an introduction will be given to basic studio hardware and software, such as the mixing desk, amplifiers, speakers, cables and types of microphones and their uses use: XY, AB, MS, Binaural. We will talk about recording, sampling, editing, sound effects and various software and plugins.
During the course we will listen to pieces from important composers and discuss them. We will discuss examples of noise music, musique concrète, soundscapes, electronic music, sound- plays and field-recordings, but also other types of music in order to see how musical systems work.
All the students attending the course are expected to finish a number of exercises in listening, recording and editing. At the end of the course each student is asked to produce a composition in sound.

Credits: 4 ECTS
No. of classes: 8 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To gain fundamental insight in the workings of music and sound.
Examination: attendance, assignment



SoundWorlds 2: Sounding Space, Spacing Sound
Robert Pravda
Mandatory for: free choice

As much as we experience our environment visually, we also have an ability to sense our environment through listening. We sense the spatial attributes through hearing as something parallel to our visual perception. What we hear is a complex mixture of the surrounding sound with its reflections, dispersion, refraction and absorption, all determined by the specific (unique) acoustic character of the space. While listening, we react both to sound sources and to spatial acoustics.
In the first week of the course, we will build upon the SoundWorlds introduction course, with emphasis on more advanced approach to different techniques in sound recording, synthesis, transformation and spatialisation.
The second week will be dedicated to development and hands-on experiments in; how to approach sound organisation for a multichannel sound reproduction, a live performance setup, or a sound installation based on individual artistic ideas of the participants.

Credits: 4 ECTS
No. of classes: 8 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To gain more advance knowledge in the workings of sound in its environment.
Examination: attendance, assignment



Spectra – Space as an Organism (3)
Julia Willms, Andrea Božić
Mandatory for: free choice (CASS Exchange Workshop)

In this in-disciplinary workshop we will approach space as performative and as an organism. We will explore the organic logic of dreams and apply it to hard infrastructures of the physical space such as architecture and merge it with virtual space to open up a third – new imaginal space – in their overlap. We will collect dreams and map them into architectural space, weaving them into new spatial narratives and allowing the logic of time and space in dreams to reorganise the logic of the actual space. We will further explore a combination of live performance, cinematic/virtual and architectural space merging them into one layered hybrid space in their overlap, a merger between the physical, imaginal and virtual. The students will work in small collaborative groups exploring performative and audio-visual installative spatial set ups and narratives. We will work through a combination of making, presenting and feedback discussion. The students are asked to bring their own audio-visual digital devices that they normally use in their artistic practice. Full participation in the workshop is requested, as each day will build on the previous.
The workshop is part of the research and creation process for PoroCity, our new performance that will premiere in Amsterdam in early 2018. PoroCity is part of Spectra – space as an organism, our long term artistic practice and research into attention and space and how their organisation affects our sense of embodiment, emergent realities and infrastructures. In Spectra we work with the whole space and the visitor’s presence in it as part of the work. There is no such thing as empty space or a position outside of space. We are not in the space but we are space.
Keywords: porous space, perforated space, performative space, performance as a passage, space as an organism, in-disciplinary.
This course builds further on last years’s Spectra, but students need no prior knowledge of last year.

Credits: 2 ECTS
No. of classes: 5 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To gain artistic insight in how space, attention and their organisation affect our sense of embodiment, emergent realities and infrastructures.
Examination: attendance, assignment



Studium Generale
Hanne Hagenaars (KABK) et al
Mandatory for: B2

The Studium Generale offers a nearly weekly programme of lectures of very different nature, based around a yearly central theme. Mandatory for second year Bachelors, but highly recommended for all other years of the Bachelors and Masters!

Credits: 1 ECTS
No. of classes: approx 24 classes of 1.5 hours
Objective: To gain general contextual insight.
Examination: attendance



Writing as/in Research
Maya Rasker
Mandatory for: free choice

To write, means to allow ideas, notions, knowledge, nonsense to come into being – which is a good reason why so many fear the act of writing: once written, your thoughts become a reality of their own. During the workshop Writing as / in Research we will investigate what writing means – as an act of unravelling and discovering of the mind’s working, rather than to fixate embryonal cerebral thinking (that often should not see the light of day – yet).
Point of departure is you – a creative creature that oscillates between who you are, what you do, and where you are heading. Through a sytematic analysis of the creative process you will discover how different writing techniques support and enhance your personal search for artistic growth – no matter your medium or main artistic interest.
Language is our material, so the course encompasses lots of writing, reading, listening and taking notes. The use of pen, or pencil, and paper is obligatory. No laptops allowed in the classroom.

Credits: 4 ECTS
No. of classes: 8 classes of 6 hours
Objective: To develop writing skills as an artistic discipline, and/or as a tool to develop artistic research.
Examination: attendance, assignment